Archive for 6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

Integration of Wind Energy in China

6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

China Wind Energy Development Roadmap 2050

This roadmap foresees wind power capacity reaching 200 GW by 2020, 400 GW by 2030 and 1 000 GW by 2050. Wind power will be one of five main power sources, and will meet 17% of electricity demand. As technology improves and wind power is scaled up, there are no insurmountable barriers to realising these ambitious targets, with respect to resources, technology, industry and the power system.  Depending on the cost of wind energy development and the transmission cost of wind power in different areas, the supply curves in this roadmap will be achieved. If the marginal tariff for wind power is set at CNY 0.55/ kWh excluding the transmission cost for long distance, 700 GW could be installed around seven strategic concentrations.   Before 2020, land-based wind power will dominate, with offshore wind power at the demonstration stage; from 2021 to 2030, both land and offshore wind power will be developed, and far offshore wind power will be in demonstration; after 2030, wind power will be developed further on land and offshore.

6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

Research Report Executive Summary: China Wind Power Development Towards 2030-Feasibility Study on Wind Power Contribution to 10% of Power Demand in China

In order to quickly turn wind power into an alternative energy, ERI’s Center for Renewable Energy Development has worked together with the China Meteorological Administration, the State Grid Corporation of China, the China Electric Power Research Institute, the Hydropower and Water Resources Planning and Design General Institute, the Chinese Wind Energy Association and many other organizations to analyze the supporting conditions needed for rapid wind development in China, and to recommend ambitious wind development targets for 2030. This research has analyzed the feasibility of realizing the 10 percent target from such perspectives as energy and electricity demand, wind energy and land resources, and wind power technology and grid support, and will put forward policy recommendations.

6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

Wind Farm Performance Improvement Activity Consultant to Collect and Interpret Data and Recommend Corrective Actions

In the framework of the 2nd phase of the Wind Farm Performance Improvement Project data of 3 exemplary wind farms has been analysed in order to determine the performance level and to find out reasons for underperformance of individual machines or a complete wind farm. Based on these analyses then improvement measures have been identified that could help to increase the performance of the wind farms.

6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

Joint Memorandum on Realising the Opportunity and Potential of the Chinese Wind Market 2007

In the past, China has typically met its increased demands for electricity by burning more coal, but this has had very serious environmental consequences. The country has abundant wind resources, and the environmental benefits of utilizing this renewable resource are likely to be considerable. In order to spur its development, it has been proposed that the wind resource be treated much like oil or natural gas—and that Wind Resource Concessions (WRC) be established and granted to developers offering the most attractive bidding prices. This report addresses the potential use of the WRC approach within China. Both the conventional energy business and renewable energy business are affected by WRC. Their concerns are described, and the single most problematic aspect of wind power development—its high cost with respect to alternatives—is then addressed. Wind power will require governmental support, and this report describes potential policy approaches for providing such support, and for developing

6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

National Action Plan for China’s Wind Power Industry Development

Developing and utilizing wind energy represent one global trend. Following the IT industry, the wind power industry has already become a sunrise industry. Wind power is expected to meet 12% of electricity demand, create 1.8 million job opportunities and reduce more than 10 billion tonnes of CO2 emission globally by 2020. China has made significant progress in developing and utilizing wind energy as a result of more than 10 years’ effort. By the end of 2003, 40 wind farms had been established and 1042 units of WTG installed with total capacity of 567.02 MW, ranking the tenth largest wind power country.

6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

China Wind Power National Action Plan

6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

Steps Towards a Wind Resource Concession Approach in China

In the past, China has typically met its increased demands for electricity by burning more coal, but this has had very serious environmental consequences. The country has abundant wind resources, and the environmental benefits of utilizing this renewable resource are likely to be considerable. In order to spur its development, it has been proposed that the wind resource be treated much like oil or natural gas—and that Wind Resource Concessions (WRC) be established and granted to developers offering the most attractive bidding prices. This report addresses the potential use of the WRC approach within China. Both the conventional energy business and renewable energy business are affected by WRC. Their concerns are described, and the single most problematic aspect of wind power development—its high cost with respect to alternatives—is then addressed. Wind power will require governmental support, and this report describes potential policy approaches for providing such support, and for developing the WRC program.

6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations