Archive for 1.5 General “Green” concerns

The China Greentech Report 2013: China at a Crossroads 2013

The China Greentech Report is the leading must-read primer on China’s greentech markets, now produced annually and distributed globally in Chinese and English at no cost for the readers. The purpose of the annual Report is to educate markets and stakeholders about key trends, opportunities and challenges so that together, we can accelerate China’s greentech market growth. The fourth Report in this series by the China Greentech Initiative, the 2013 Report examines China’s current pollution challenges and assesses the progress made in meeting energy and environmental targets set within the 12th Five-Year Plan. The Report concludes that quantitative targets alone are insufficient for China to move towards a more sustainable model of development, and suggests a new eight-point approach focused on measurable outcomes. Also featured in the 2013 Report are five “Visions and Roadmaps” developed by CGTI partner companies and government advisors across key greentech ecosystems: Built Environment, Electric Vehicles, Low Carbon Eco-Cities, Next-Generation Energy Value Chains, and Sustainability.

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

Impact Report on Green SMEs in China

As the first report targeting the green SME sector in China, it explores and develops a methodology to evaluate the business, environmental and social performance of green SMEs in seven green sectors, evaluates the contribution that green SMEs have made to China’s economic transformation. It also highlights the challenges to the development of green SMEs, and discovers their needs as well as explores different ways in which SMEs can realize “environmentally friendly” and “resource-saving” development.

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China

Local level actions are crucial for achieving energy saving and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. Yet it can be challenging to implement new policies and actions due to a lack of information, funding, and capacity at the local level—especially in developing countries such as China. Even though the Chinese government has set national energy and carbon intensity reduction targets, most local governments do not have sufficient knowledge regarding actions to achieve the targets, effectiveness and cost of policies, or how to design and implement a low carbon development plan. This article presents information for local governments on how to create an action plan to tackle climate change and increase energy efficiency. The research examines indicators that can be used to define low carbon development and to evaluate the effectiveness of actions taken. The guidance provides a step by step description of how action plans can be established and essential elements to be included—from preparing a GHG emission inventory to implementation of the plan. It also provides a menu of policies and best practices found internationally and in China to encourage low carbon development in industry, buildings, transportation, power, agriculture and forestry.

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

China: Leader or Laggard On the Path to a Secure, Low-Carbon Energy Future

There has been a great deal of talk about whether and how China will manage its need to provide enough energy to ensure continued economic growth while avoiding the local and global environmental impacts of its energy production and use. To listen to the political discourse, China is either a global leader on clean energy technologies and transformation or the largest source of emissions with serious, systemic local environmental degradation. How can it at once be a low-carbon leader and a laggard? China’s ability to be both lies in the pace of its current energy transformation, its size, and its willingness to put in place tough policies to try and alter its current energy trajectory. With the current energy mix, China’s rapid growth and the associated environmental implications will undoubtedly wreak havoc on the global climate and local environmental conditions. Chinese policymakers recognize the unsustainable nature of their development pathway and have instituted a series of policies to steer them toward a more sustainable course. These policies have attracted staggering amounts of investment and made China the most exciting market on Earth for clean energy technology ventures. The truth, however, is that this pathway will be difficult to journey and navigates a great deal of uncharted territory. If China manages to overcome these obstacles, it could help the rest of the global community overcome some shared challenges. In reality, the outlook for China’s future energy use is enormously complicated and does not lend itself to a simple categorization of “leader” or “laggard.” This report seeks to clarify key aspects of China’s efforts to pursue a secure, low-carbon pathway and the challenges the government faces.

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

Green Economy and Green Jobs in China: Current Status and Potentials for 2020

Since 2000, and especially during the 11th Five-Year period of 2006–10, China has prioritized green development in almost all of its leading economic sectors.  One of the greatest promises of China’s green transition is the potential for expanded employment in industries and economic sectors that can help slow and possibly reduce the country’s environmental impact. This report explores greening activities in three leading sectors of China’s economy: energy, transportation, and forestry. It sheds light on the current scale of investment and employment in these sectors and suggests potentials for 2020

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

The Green Rebound: Clean Energy to Become an Important Component of Global Recovery Plans

2008 ended with the EU agreeing the world’s largest climate  package; renewables emerged as the main winner and carbon  costs were limited following intense lobbying. The baton of climate leadership now passes to the US, where clean energy is set to form a prominent part of President Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Plan. Emerging markets are also upgrading their policies, particularly in China and India, but we expect only an outline agreement (if that) to emerge from the Copenhagen climate summit in December.

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

An Emerging Revolution: Clean Technology Research, Development and Innovation in China

This working paper examines efforts made by China—the world’s largest gross emitter of greenhouse gases—to create an enabling environment for R&D and innovation in the field of clean technology.

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

China’s Green Revolution – Prioritizing Technologies to Achieve Energy and Environmental Sustainability

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

China’s Clean Revolution: Opportunities for a Low Carbon Future

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns

China’s Approach Towards a Low Carbon Future

1 Energy and Climate, 1.5 General “Green" concerns