Archive for 5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

China’s Nuclear Backlash Fosters Local Power

When Ding Jie, a water program officer for Wuhu Ecology Center, travelled to Wangjiang County, in China’s Southern Anhui province, to examine local water pollution cases this spring, she encountered something surprising. Ding was amazed to learn of Wangjiang’s popular protest movement against a nuclear plant being built in neighboring Pengze, across the Yangtze, in Jiangxi province. Wangjiang is located downstream of Pengze, where Jiangxi’s first nuclear power plant was underway. Pengze was poised to be the first nuclear power station in an inland province. However, the Chinese government halted its construction after Japan’s Fukushima nuclear accident in March 2011. Local opposition at Wangjiang, led by retired local governmental officials, has been strong. When Ding Jie shared information about the protest movement with her office colleagues in Wuhu, she learned that their city is also proposing a nuclear power plant.

5 Nuclear, 5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

Japan’s Nuclear Crisis Sparks Concerns over Nuclear Power in China

Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao clearly knows that Japan is a neighbour China can not ignore. Wen was quick to offer assistance to Japan for its efforts to deal with earthquake and Tsunami and also visited Fukushima in late May.  Chinese public watched over TV the calm and civilized response of ordinary Japanese citizens in the face of major crisis. It is also the first time that Japanese self-defence troops were featured in Chinese TV channels as a mobilized force to engage in rescue and humanitarian efforts, similar with what they saw about China’s own army during the time of need. Undoubtedly, the Fukushima nuclear crisis has had an enormous impact on China. With a large Chinese population living and working in Japan, the Chinese government and a great many Chinese citizens have been keeping a close watch on the unfolding events.

5 Nuclear, 5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

China’s Nuclear Future

A collection of essays about China’s nuclear future in the wake of the Fukushima accident in Japan. China Dialogue March 17-April 26 2011 Special Series.

5 Nuclear, 5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

No Nukes declaration

A Coalition of 36 Citizens’ Groups. We stand in solidarity with all fellow citizens of this Planet to say NO, clearly, loudly and determinately, to the use of nuclear power, because this so-called energy is destroying us and the ecosystems. What is visibly destroyed by the invisible radiation hardly scratches the surface of the destruction if the damages it inflicts on genes of humans, vegetation, and animals are taken into account. The destructive forces of abnormal genetic mutation, raging on when our sojourns on this Planet have long ended, will continue to bring about countless untold sufferings to many generations to come. (Note: on web link, English version is halfway down the page). A variety of other news and articles can be found at http://www.greenpartypost.net/nonukes.html

5 Nuclear, 5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

Stop Nuclear Proliferation, Stop Nuking Asia Our Homeland, Stop Putting up the Level of Background Radiation for the World

We, Asian people concerned about health, and ecological and genetic threats posed by nuclear proliferation in military and civilian realms, are most disappointed by your government’s continuous active engagement in nuclear business after the Fukushima nuclear disaster and numerous testimonies to nuclear harm to humans, future generations, and the ecologies. The presence of representatives from your country at Nuclear Energy Asia 2011 Conference in Hong Kong  clearly demonstrates the nuclear industry-government-IAEA collaboration to relentlessly pursue self-interest at the expense of well-being and sustainability of all lives on earth, by promoting nuclear technologies which will discharge more and more deadly man-made radioactivity into the air, soil, waters and atmosphere and eventually all of the global environment.

 

5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

Stop Disinforming the World on Nuclear Radiation Risks; Protect Japanese People especially the Children; and Phasing out of All Nuclear Power

Due to the seriousness of radiation contamination by Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and the gross negligence by your government of the harm suffered by the Japanese people, we call for your government to redress grievances at policy level with no delay.

5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

Public Statement in Condemnation of the Forum on “Increasing Nuclear Literacy in Hong Kong”

We strongly protest against the staging of the captioned forum for reasons as follows: 1. Hong Kong people are not nuclear risk-illiterate as the conference title implies. We are fully aware of the risks of using nuclear energy and will struggle for an open, democratic, and responsible system for energy decision making, whereby we can get rid of nuclear power and the lethal radioactivity it releases in the first instance. (Note: on web link, English version is halfway down the page)

5 Nuclear, 5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

Report on Hongyanhe Nuclear Power Plant

China’s nuclear power industry has been steadily expanding since the construction of the Qinshan nuclear power plant in 1991. With the 2005-2020 Chinese energy plan’s promotion of nuclear power, nuclear development is currently entering a new period of expansion. Nuclear power, as the government has publicly campaigned, has many benefits, such as mitigating energy pressure, strengthening national energy security, improving the atmospheric environment, upgrading manufacturing technology, and promoting scientific and technological progress. However, each nuclear power project is large-scale, with many environmental and social implications; thus a comprehensive assessment of nuclear projects should be performed to understand how to mitigate their impact on society and the environment. The following report is an outline of the many factors associated with the construction of a nuclear power plant, and may be considered a useful survey of the issues at hand.(Note: this article is partly in Chinese and partly and English, please scroll down to find the English)

5 Nuclear, 5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)

China’s Emerging Antinuclear Movement

On August 18, 2007, China officially started the construction of the Hongheyan nuclear power plant, 110 km north of Dalian city in Liaoning province, kicking off a new round of nuclear power building in China. Using China’s own CPR 1000 nuclear technology, the Hongheyan nuclear power plant will have six reactors, each with a capacity of 1,000 MW. Though Chinese media reported an assurance from governmental officials on the safety of nuclear reactors, in a rare stance China Daily publicized concerns over nuclear safety from residents in nearby Changxing Island. Nuclear Monitor No. 663.

5 Nuclear, 5.2 Civil Society Selected Articles (Including Hongkong Civil Society)