Archive for 6.1 General Renewable Energy

Integration of Renewable Energy in China: Introducing Lessons Learnt From Europe

Author China National Renewable Energy Centre, Kaare Sandholt, September 2012
Publisher
Link http://www.cnrec.org.cn/english/publication/2012-09-14-331.html
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.3 Recommendations and International Lessons

Feasibility Study for the Establishment of a Chinese Renewable Energy Centre- Survey on US RE Centres: Case Study of NREL

Abstract In accordance with the terms of reference and the inception report for this assignment, a case study of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been developed. The case study aims to provide the reader with an understanding of NREL’s (I) objectives activities, impact and (II) budget and resources as well as how those two legs tie into (III) NREL’s organization and operations. The final chapter will contextualize the findings to China.
Author China-Denmark Renewable Energy Development (RED) Programme, March 2011
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Link
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.3 Recommendations and International Lessons

Regional Renewable Energy Planning: International Case Studies, Lessons Learned

Abstract This study was commissioned by the GEF / World Bank Assisted China Renewable Energy Scale-up Program (CRESP), and by the Energy Foundation’s China Sustainable Energy Program (CSEP). Its purpose is to assist China’s Center for Renewable Energy Development (CRED) to complete a study on provincial renewable energy planning, including the development of specific planning methodologies that China’s provinces might follow. According to the requirements of China’s Renewable Energy Law, approved in 2005, the Government of China has established national renewable energy targets. These targets are not yet specifically allocated to provinces but, for the national targets to be implemented effectively, provincial renewable energy objectives must also be established. In fact, the Renewable Energy Law requires that China’s national government, cooperating with provincial, autonomous region, and municipal governments, establish mid- and long-term targets for renewable energy development and utilization within each of these smaller administrative regions.1 These local targets are to be consistent with the national targets, but are also to consider the economic context and resource potential at the local/regional level. Importantly, to ensure that the subsequent renewable energy targets are achieved, each relevant provincial, autonomous region, and municipal government2 is required to establish and implement a renewable energy development and utilization plan.
Author Center for Resource Solutions/ GEF / World Bank China Renewable Energy Scale-up Program (CRESP), Energy Foundation China Sustainable Energy Program , December 2008
Publisher
Link http://www.cresp.org.cn/uploadfiles/7/1034/regional_renewable_energy_planning_december_2008_final.pdf
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.3 Recommendations and International Lessons

International Experience with Public Benefit Funds: A Focus on Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

Abstract Renewable energy and energy efficiency investments have long been supported through public policy efforts in a wide array of countries. Public benefits funds (PBFs) are one of several policy tools that might be used to provide this support, and PBFs have become increasingly common in recent years, especially as competition in the electricity industry has increased. While the objectives of different PBF programs are often similar, the structures and means to deliver energy efficiency and renewable energy services through PBFs show much wider variation across countries and U.S. states. This report summarizes international experience with PBF policies that target renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) investments, and identifies lessons learned from these experiences that are applicable to the Chinese context.
Author Energy Foundation, China Sustainable Energy Program, by Ryan Wiser, Catherine Murray, Jan Hamrin, Rick Weston, 16 October 2013
Publisher
Link http://www.efchina.org/csepupfiles/report/2006102695218803.9727694829052.pdf/China_PBF_101603_final.pdf
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.3 Recommendations and International Lessons

Renewable Power for China: Past, Present, and Future

Abstract This paper briefly examines the history, status, policy situation, development issues, and prospects for key renewable power technologies in China. The country has become a global leader in wind turbine and solar photovoltaic (PV) production, and leads the world in total power capacity from renewable energy. Policy frameworks have matured and evolved since the landmark 2005 Renewable Energy Law, updated in 2009. China’s 2020 renewable energy target is similar to that of the EU. However, China continues to face many challenges in technology development, grid-integration, and policy frameworks. These include training, research and development, wind turbine operating experience and performance, transmission constraints, grid interconnection time lags, resource assessments, power grid integration on large scales, and continued policy development and adjustment. Wind and solar PV targets for 2020 will likely be satisfied early, although domestic demand for solar PV remains weak and the pathways toward incorporating distributed and building-integrated solar PV are uncertain. Prospects for biomass power are limited by resource constraints. Other technologies such as concentrating solar thermal power, ocean energy, and electricity storage require greater attention.
Author Eric Martinot , Frontiers of Energy and Power Engineering in China Vol. 4, No. 3, 2010
Publisher
Link http://www.martinot.info/Martinot_FEPE4-3.pdf
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.3 Recommendations and International Lessons

The Rural Electrification in China and the Impact of Renewable Energies

Author EU-China Business Management Training Project, Tomás Hevia MBA 2009, China Europe International Business School, Student Research Projects/Outputs No. 042
Publisher
Link http://www.ceibs.edu/bmt/images/20110221/30210.pdf
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.4 Rural Renewable Energy Use

Financing Rural Renewable Energy: A Comparison Between China and India

Abstract This paper analyses the current status of rural renewable energy in China and India, develops and employs an analysis framework to study the environment, channels, instruments and innovative mechanisms of financing rural renewable energy in China and India.
Author ISAS Working Paper No 44, 23rd May 2008, by Huang Liming
Publisher
Link http://www.frankhaugwitz.info/doks/general/2008_05_23_China_RE_Finance_Comparison_India.pdf
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.4 Rural Renewable Energy Use

Rural Electrification, Human Development and the Renewable Energy Potential of China

Abstract Recognizing the successes of other countries, including Bangladesh and Chile, the Chinese government focused on rural electrification programs as a means of stimulating industrial growth and movement towards further modernization. Since the inception of efforts at rural electrification, China has been successful in electrifying 98% of its population. This was accomplished while maintaining high rates of growth and improved human development indicators, like literacy and infant mortality rates, as well as per capita income. Because of China’s electrification programs, it has achieved incredible success in moving towards its own development goal, as well as those of the United Nations Millennium; however, there is plenty of room for improvement.
Author Global Energy Network Institute (GENI), by Peter Meisen and Nicole Cavino , October 2007
Publisher
Link http://www.frankhaugwitz.info/doks/general/2007_10_China_RE_Rural_Electrification_GENI.pdf
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.4 Rural Renewable Energy Use

Renewable Energy Options for Poor Rural Western Areas of China

Abstract As a developing country with both large area and tremendous population, although China’s economy is growing rapidly, there are still large quantities of population in poverty, the majority of who are dispersed in the remote western part of China. The western provinces enjoy the best renewable resources in China. The harnessing of RE resources to serve the rural residents, particularly the poor in remote areas is the requirement of building a well-off society. Furthermore, RE resource utilization will help the ecology protection that is becoming significant. More specific, it is the government’s obligations to find solutions to supply the unelectrified population clean energies. This paper is trying to provide a justification in harnessing the RE resources to reduce the poverty from the energy supply point of view. An overall initial assessment will be presented regarding the poverty situation in China, RE resources, RE technologies, as well as motivations and barriers in developing RE resources. Barriers analysis will be drawn from some selected case studies. At last, the paper attempts to show the policy outlines to address these problems.
Author Renewable Energy Technologies/ Global Network on Energy for Sustainable Development, by Gao Hu, Wang Zhong Ying, Zhao Yong Qiang, Energy Research Institute (ERI) of National Development and Reform Commission (NRDC), 14 December 2005
Publisher
Link http://www.frankhaugwitz.info/doks/general/2005_12_China_RE_Options_For_Western_Rural_Poor_GNESD.pdf
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.4 Rural Renewable Energy Use

The Brightness and Township Electrification Program of China

Abstract China is a developing country with about 70% rural population; Rural infrastructure is poor, it needs be improved with a great efforts; In recent years, more than RMB 280 billion (EURO 28 billion) have been invested for rural grid improvement including extensions. However, by the end of 2003, there are still about 29,000 villages with about 7 million rural households (about 3.55% of the total population) which are not connected to the grid. The “Brightness Program of China ” was drawn up under the leadership of former State Development Planning Commission during 1996 till 1999 The plan is to speed up the activity of decentralized electrification of remote rural areas; it is also a positive response to the proposal of the world solar summit in Zimbabwe. It is planned that 23 million people in remote area shall be electrified by wind and PV technologies till 2010 with an average capacity of 100 W per capita. The total installed capacity will reach 2,300 MW then.
Author Prof. Ma Shenghong, Beijing Jikedian Renewable Energy Development Center, June 2004
Publisher
Link www.frankhaugwitz.info/doks/general/2004_06_Ma_Presentation_Bonn_Brightness.pdf
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.1.4 Rural Renewable Energy Use