Archive for 6.2.0 Wind

Effective Distribution of Small Wind Power Systems in Asian Rural Areas

Abstract The Asian Development Bank (ADB) renewed its Energy Policy in 2009,1 emphasizing three priorities for achieving inclusive and sustainable growth in its developing member countries (DMCs): (i) promoting energy efficiency and renewable energy; (ii) maximizing access to energy for all; and (iii) promoting energy sector reform, capacity building, and governance. ADB has also committed to reinforcing its efforts to facilitate the transfer of low-carbon technologies to DMCs and to double financial support for clean energy projects to $2 billion per year by 2013 to enhance regional energy diversity and security. The proposed research and development technical assistance (TA) on Effective Deployment of Distributed Small Wind Power Systems in Asian Rural Areas will help implement ADB’s Energy Policy and assist DMCs in scaling up viable renewable energy development with private sector involvement to improve the quality of life of the poor. It will create opportunities for ADB’s sovereign and nonsovereign lending operations, build local capacities, and strengthen regional cooperation on clean energy technology development and deployment. The vice-president (Operations 1) approved concept clearance of the TA on 2 October 2009.2 The design and monitoring framework is in Appendix 1.The TA builds on ADB’s Energy for All Initiative3 and aims to supply reliable and affordable emission-free electricity to poor communities in remote windy areas at no fuel cost. It will explore innovative and practical approaches to (i) reduce costs of wind power equipment by transferring appropriate technologies and optimizing manufacturing processes; (ii) reshape financing modalities and instruments, and mobilize carbon credits in a pragmatic way; (iii) encourage public–private partnerships to stimulate investment and research and development activities for clean and renewable energy; (iv) displace combustion of biomass and fossil fuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and (v) improve national and village-level capacities for planning, implementing, and maintaining decentralized systems for power generation and distribution. The TA is aligned with ADB’s Medium-Term Corporate Strategic Priorities for Research, especially (i) promoting inclusive growth, (ii) addressing climate change, and (iii) coping with rising commodity prices.
Author Asian Development Bank, December 2009
Publisher
Link http://www.frankhaugwitz.info/doks/wind/2009_12_ADB_Small_Distributed_Wind_43458-REG-TAR_ADB.pdf
Attachment
6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.8 Small-scale Wind

Establishment of Wind Turbine Certification Capabilities (China Classification Society)

Abstract The project aims to establish the WTGS model certification and project certification capacities, according to the quality and safety standards of the international WTGS. The model certification includes the design assessment, quality management assessment and the prototype testing from the design institutions. The project certification is based on the model certification, including the wind farm site assessment, wind turbine assembly monitoring, wind turbine transportation, installation, witnessing the inspection, and the regular monitoring. The model certification and project certification are the important foundation of China’s wind power industry competing in the domestic and overseas markets. The stage tasks of the project are to establish and improve the technology rule system of the wind turbine model certification, to make the wind turbine model certification approved by CNCA; and the wind turbine model procedure approval of CNAS can be obtained.
Author China Renewable Energy Scale-up Programme (CRESP), Update date:24 July 2011
Publisher
Link http://www.cresp.org.cn/english/content.asp?id=1464
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.5 Measurement, Certifications and Testing

Establishment of Wind Turbine Certification Capabilities (China Electric Power Research Institute)

Abstract “Building the Wind Turbine Testing Center (WTTC) ” is one of the sub-grant projects of CRESP wind turbine technological progress activities at the national level. which aims to enhance China wind turbine testing capability, promote the wind power development in China. The target of the project is to set up the third-party testing center for quality inspection of wind turbine products, in accordance with the GB/T15481-2005(ISO/IEC 17025:2005) General Requirements of the Testing and Calibration Laboratory Capabilities, WTGS series of national standards, international standards and the related standards.
Author China Renewable Energy Scale-up Programme (CRESP), Update date:26 July 2011
Publisher
Link http://www.cresp.org.cn/english/content.asp?id=1462
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.5 Measurement, Certifications and Testing

Establishment of Wind Turbine Certification Capabilities (China General Certification Center in Beijing)

Abstract The project aims to establish the WTGS model certification and project certification capacities, according to the quality and safety standards of the international WTGS. The model certification includes the design assessment, quality management assessment and the prototype testing from the design institutions. The project certification is based on the model certification, including the wind farm site assessment, wind turbine assembly monitoring, wind turbine transportation, installation, witnessing the inspection, and the regular monitoring. The model certification and project certification are the important foundation of China’s wind power industry competing in the domestic and overseas markets. The stage tasks of the project are to establish and improve the technology rule system of the wind turbine model certification, to make the wind turbine model certification approved by CNCA; and the wind turbine model procedure approval of CNAS can be obtained.
Author China Renewable Energy Scale-up Programme (CRESP), Update date:23 July 2011
Publisher
Link http://www.cresp.org.cn/english/content.asp?id=1465
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.5 Measurement, Certifications and Testing

Establishment of Wind Turbine Testing Center for CWTC (The China Wind Testing Center of China Classification Society)

Abstract The WTGS Testing Center was established by the Wind Power Testing and Research Center of China Classification Society. The WTGS testing and technical capabilities were established and enhanced roundly through the compilation of the testing guidance documents to improve the wind power quality management system, purchasing a large number of wind power testing equipment, instruments and analysis software, building the storage and analysis platform of large-scale wind turbine testing data, participating in the wind power testing technology training, and carrying out the testing practice, etc. By now, the centre already has the technical capabilities of wind turbine load testing, power performance testing, power quality testing and noise testing.
Author China Renewable Energy Scale-up Programme (CRESP), Update date:25 July 2011
Publisher
Link http://www.cresp.org.cn/english/content.asp?id=1463
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6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.5 Measurement, Certifications and Testing

Four Presentations from the RE Pricing Training

Abstract Wind Energy Association (CWEA) held a training on renewable electricity pricing on December 13th, 2010. The international renewable energy expert Mr. Ole Langniss and Associate Professor Ms. SHI Jingli of ERI were invited and contracted by the CWEA for preparing and delivering presentations on international and national experience in the area. The 4 presentations of this training listed below are now available on the Energy Foundation website: 1. Current Status of Renewable Power Pricing Policies in Europe_Ole  (bilingual), 2. Value of Renewable Power_Ole  (bilingual), 3. Adjustment of Tariffs_Ole (bilingual), 4. Chinese RE Pricing Policies_SHI Jingli_CN (Mandarin Only).
Author Chinese Wind Energy Association, 13 December 2010
Publisher
Link http://www.efchina.org/FReports.do?act=detail&id=300
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.10 Finances and Pricing

Fujian Offshore Wind Farm Development Methodology

Abstract SgurrEnergy has been appointed by CRESP to assist with the development of a methodology leading to production of an implementation plan to exploit the offshore wind resource of Fujian province. Deliverable 4 of this assignment requires that practical application of the suggested methodology be described with regard to offshore wind farm site selection, wind resource measurement and wind resource evaluation. The most appropriate way for this requirement to be delivered was considered to be by way of example and this report applies the suggested methodology to a fictitious offshore wind farm near to Pinghai Peninsula, Putian.
Author SgurrEnergy and China Renewable Energy Scale-up Programme (CRESP), Delivery 4, June 2008
Publisher
Link http://www.cresp.org.cn/uploadfiles/7/1062/fujian%20offshore%20wind%20farm%20development%20methodology.pdf
Attachment
6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.7 Offshore Wind

Huge Waste of Wind-Generated Electricity in 2011

Date 2012 04 12
Author
Publisher Caixin
Link http://china-wire.org/?p=19776
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6.2.12 Some Recent Articles on Wind Energy

Integration of Wind Energy in China

Author China National Renewable Energy Centre, Kaare Sandholt
Publisher
Link http://www.cnrec.org.cn/english/publication/2012-06-07-298.html
Attachment
6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations

Joint Memorandum on Realising the Opportunity and Potential of the Chinese Wind Market 2007

Abstract In the past, China has typically met its increased demands for electricity by burning more coal, but this has had very serious environmental consequences. The country has abundant wind resources, and the environmental benefits of utilizing this renewable resource are likely to be considerable. In order to spur its development, it has been proposed that the wind resource be treated much like oil or natural gas—and that Wind Resource Concessions (WRC) be established and granted to developers offering the most attractive bidding prices. This report addresses the potential use of the WRC approach within China. Both the conventional energy business and renewable energy business are affected by WRC. Their concerns are described, and the single most problematic aspect of wind power development—its high cost with respect to alternatives—is then addressed. Wind power will require governmental support, and this report describes potential policy approaches for providing such support, and for developing
Author Chinese Renewable Energy Industry Association, China Wind Energy Association and Global Wind Energy Council 2007
Publisher
Link http://gwec.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/memorandum.pdf
Attachment
6 Renewable Energy, 6.2.0 Wind, 6.2.2 Government and International Institutions, and Industry Policy, Strategies and Recommendations