Archive for 4 Hydropower

Sinohydro Projects Overseas

Abstract This spreadsheet, downloadable below, contains 203 dam projects the Sinohydro Corporation is involved in outside of China. For some of the projects, only a memorandum of understanding has been signed. Others are currently being studied regarding their feasibility or are under construction. Yet others have already been completed. The spreadsheet is based on media reports, and the sources of information are indicated. In some cases, we have double-checked the information, but we are not able to do this comprehensively, and cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information. Please be aware that not all entries in the database may be up to date. While some projects on the list may not go forward, others may be missing. We welcome corrections and additions. The spreadsheet is an information service which does not give exact figures, but indicates the approximate scale of dam building by Sinohydro around the world.
Author International Rivers, May 30, 2012
Publisher
Link http://www.internationalrivers.org/resources/sinohydro-projects-overseas-3580
Attachment
4 Hydropower, 4.2 International Rivers Reports, 4.2.2 China’s Role in Building Dams Globally

Cambodia’s Hydropower Development and China’s Involvement

Abstract Cambodia is on the threshold of committing to an extensive domestic hydropower development program, financed with the support of the Chinese government and facilitated through the technical expertise of Chinese construction companies. The Cambodian government has prioritized access to cheap and reliable electricity to sustain its economic development, yet as a result of decades of fighting and instability, Cambodia’s electricity infrastructure remains rudimentary and the cost of electricity amongst the highest in the world. In response, the Cambodian government plans to prioritize the exploitation of Cambodia’s hydropower resources together with the construction of a network of high-voltage transmission lines that would connect remote hydropower stations to urban centers and also facilitate power imports from Thailand and Vietnam. (Note: the English language part of this document starts on p12.)
Author Carl Middleton, International Rivers and Rivers Coalition in Cambodia, January 2008
Publisher
Link http://www.internationalrivers.org/files/attached-files/cambodia_hydropower_and_chinese_involvement_jan_2008.pdf
Attachment
4 Hydropower, 4.2 International Rivers Reports, 4.2.2 China’s Role in Building Dams Globally

Dams Built by China

Abstract 3 pages of links to many detailed case studies in Africa and Asia
Author International Rivers
Publisher
Link http://www.internationalrivers.org/taxonomy/term/1045
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
4 Hydropower, 4.2 International Rivers Reports, 4.2.2 China’s Role in Building Dams Globally

Failed Mechanism: How the CDM is subsidizing hydro developers and harming the Kyoto Protocol

Abstract The Kyoto Protocol’s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is set to provide massive subsidies to hydropower developers while increasing greenhouse gas emissions, according to an investigation by International Rivers. As of November 1, 2007, 654 hydro projects had received or applied to receive carbon credits from the CDM. If approved, these credits would provide hydro developers with a windfall of around a billion dollars each year. Hydro is now the most common technology in the CDM, representing a quarter of all projects in the project pipeline. International Rivers’ report, “Failed Mechanism: How the CDM is subsidizing hydro developers and harming the Kyoto Protocol,” was released on December 2, 2007, at the UN climate negotiations in Bali. “The CDM is blindly subsidizing the destruction of rivers, while the dams it supports are helping destroy the environmental integrity of the CDM,” says report author Barbara Haya, a consultant for International Rivers.
Author Barbara Haya, International Rivers Network, November 2007,
Publisher
Link http://www.internationalrivers.org/files/attached-files/failed_mechanism_3.pdf
Attachment
4 Hydropower, 4.2 International Rivers Reports, 4.2.2 China’s Role in Building Dams Globally

Averting a Nightmare on the Nu

Abstract Once-defeated plans to build a cascade of dams on China’s Nu River are regaining momentum. Katy Yan took a journey to Yunnan to find out what’s at stake.
Author Katy Yan, China Dialogue, May 26 2011
Publisher
Link http://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/4314
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
4 Hydropower, 4.3 Additional reports from civil society organizations

Interview with Sun and Xu, At fault on the Nu River

Abstract As China gears up for a hydropower push in its earthquake-prone south-west, it should pause to consider events in Japan, two geologists tell Liu Jianqiang on World Water Day. With the ongoing crisis at its earthquake-damaged Fukushima nuclear plant, Japan is paying a heavy price for ignoring “large-scale environmental evaluations”. This is the assessment of two prominent Chinese geologists, Xu Daoyi and Sun Wenpeng, who told chinadialogue that the incident holds important lessons for China.
Author China Dialogue
Publisher
Link http://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/4174-At-fault-on-the-Nu-River
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
4 Hydropower, 4.3 Additional reports from civil society organizations

The Reform of the Urban Water Supply in Southern China

Abstract This report is not explicitly related to hydroelectric dams, but is an important piece on a related issue: the politics of water more generally. Problems associated with China’s urban water supply before its reform included water shortages, aggravation of water pollution, capital shortage, poor management, poor coverage, and low efficiency of water usage. The Chinese government, together with the support of international agencies such as the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank (ADB), assumes that the privatization of water will solve these problems. In late 2002, the Chinese government expressed her full-fledged commitment to private involvement in water management by issuing a document encouraging local authorities to open their water market to private capital and foreign investments. During the following period, we can observe many major movements in the water industry, such as large-scale contracts obtained by transnational water giants like Suez and Veolia, and the rise of local water corporations such as the Beijing Capital Group and Shenzhen Water Group. In the process of reformation, what we have seen is not only the transfer of operating rights or infrastructure from state-owned-enterprises (SOE) to for-profit private companies, we also have observed that water is increasingly being managed according to commercial criteria, which demonstrates the government’s fundamental conceptual change regarding water — from a common good to a trading commodity. It leads us to ask: Who has the control over precious water resources and services? How can we ensure an equitable, as well as a sustainable water use? What are the roles of the government in water supply? And what are the roles and places of people?
Author Globalization Monitor/Transnational Institute, Hong Kong, March 2009
Publisher
Link http://www.globalmon.org.hk/en/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/water-privatization-in-south-china_mar09.pdf
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
4 Hydropower, 4.3 Additional reports from civil society organizations

The International Center on Small Hydro Power (ICSHP), under the auspices of UNIDO, is coordinating a report on the worldwide development status of small hydro power (SHP)

Abstract The aim of the report, as a contribution to global renewable energy, is to give a global overview of the status of SHP and thereby inform SHP practitioners, policy- and decision-makers, investors, as well as those interested in clean, renewable and local energy and sustainable development. The idea to compile a comprehensive global report on small hydropower came up, since a lot of scattered information already exists on small hydropower at project, country and regional levels, as well as in different languages; however a comprehensive reference publication for decision-makers, managers and potential investors has been missing. In order to more effectively promote small hydropower (SHP) as a renewable and rural energy source and overcome existing barriers, it is essential to identify its development status in the different regions and engage the stakeholders to share existing information and experiences. Most of the contributions had been submitted by June 2012 and are currently being edited followed by peer-review. The World SHP Development Report will be published and printed with the support of UNIDO and is expected to be available to the public by the end of this year – downloadable from the IC-SHP homepage. The report will include an overview for each region (i.e. Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, North America, Latin America); the country status of over 140 countries on SHP development as well as case studies featuring technology, finance options and other topics.
Author The International Center on Small Hydro Power (ICSHP), UNIDO
Publisher
Link http://www.inshp.org/Img_Lib/UploadImg/201252511584551.pdf
Attachment
4 Hydropower, 4.3 Additional reports from civil society organizations

3 Gorges Dam Bulletins issued by the Ministry for Environmental Protection

Abstract reports, going back to 2003 all the way up to 2011. 
Author
Publisher
Link http://english.mep.gov.cn/standards_reports/threegorgesbulletin/
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
4 Hydropower, 4.1 Documents from Chinese Governmental Institutions

China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research

Abstract There are links to a number of important reports. However, they are not available online, but are available for purchase.
Author
Publisher
Link http://www.iwhr.com/english/Publications.asp
Attachment Sorry, no attachments exist.
4 Hydropower, 4.1 Documents from Chinese Governmental Institutions